New Drone Regulations for Australian Companies


If you are operating a company using drones or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), you will need to be familiar with all of the New Drone Regulations; otherwise, you may find yourself in some extremely hot water.

Australian Drone Regulations Lets Start With CASA

The following is a list of the CASA Drone Regulations: Click Here

Flying drones/remotely piloted aircraft in Australia

Depending on whether you are flying your drone for commercial purposes or for recreational/leisure purposes, different safety laws apply to remotely piloted aircraft (RPA), which is the more technically correct term for drones. These laws are defined in Part 101 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations.

You are required to hold an RPA operator’s certificate (ReOC) in order to fly for money or for any other sort of economic benefit; however, if you are flying an RPA that weighs less than two kilos, you just need to inform CASA.

If you are flying an RPA just for recreational purposes and not for commercial purposes or any other sort of economic gain, the restrictions are less stringent and enable you to fly an RPA without having to be certified as long as you adhere to certain simple safety guidelines.

Check out this information sheet for further details on the fundamental guidelines that govern the flight of RPAs.

UAV operator’s certificate (UOC) holders are allowed to continue operating in accordance with the terms of their certificate, and a ReOC will only be granted in the event that the UAV operator’s certificate is changed or renewed.

Amendments to Part 101: Simplifying the Certification Process for Remotely Piloted Aircraft The Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) has announced that modifications to Part 101 became active on September 29, 2016, which would reduce the costs and regulatory requirements for lower-risk remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) operations.

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